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Free Delivery Worldwide : Mindhunter : Paperback : Cornerstone : 9780099435679 : 0099435675 : 01 Dec 2006 : What makes… more info
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Jackie Estacado, a mob hitman possessing a mysterious, malevolent force known as the Darkness, and New York Police… more info
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What makes a serial killer? Only one man really knows. FBI Special Agent and expert in criminal profiling and… more info
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From legendary FBI profiler John Douglas and Mark Olshaker — authors of the nonfiction international bestsellers… more info
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Jackie Estacado, a mob hitman possessing a mysterious, malevolent force known as the Darkness, and New York Police… more info
$17.53
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From legendary FBI profiler John Douglas and Mark Olshaker — authors of the nonfiction international bestsellers… more info
$11.62
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What makes a serial killer? Only one man really knows. FBI Special Agent and expert in criminal profiling and… more info
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Joseph Banks Joseph Banks Joseph Banks: A Life a Life a LifeFrom $20.12
One of our greatest writers about the sea has written an engrossing story of one of history's most legendary maritime explorers. Patrick O'Brian's biography of naturalist, explorer and co-founder of Australia, Joseph Banks, is narrative history at its finest. Published to rave reviews, it reveals Banks to be a man of enduring importance, and establishes itself as a classic of exploration."It is in his description of that arduous three-year voyage on the ship Endeavor] that Mr. O'Brian is at his most brilliant. . . . He makes us understand what life within this wooden world was like, with its 94 male souls, two dogs, a cat and a goat."—Linda Colley, “New York Times”“An absorbing, finely written overview, meant for the general reader, of a major figure in the history of natural science.”—Frank Stewart, “Los Angeles Times”" This book is] the definitive biography of an extraordinary subject."—Robert Taylor, “Boston Globe”“His skill at narrative and his extensive knowledge of the maritime history . . . give him a definite leg up in telling this . . . story.”—Tom Clark, “San Francisco Chronicle”
The Tiger in the Attic: Memories of the Kindertransport and Growing Up EnglishFrom $20.99
In 1939, on the eve of Hitler's invasion of Poland, seven-year-old Edith Milton (then Edith Cohn) and her sister Ruth left Germany by way of the Kindertransport, the program which gave some 10,000 Jewish children refuge in England. The two were given shelter by a jovial, upper-class British foster family with whom they lived for the next seven years. Edith chronicles these transformative experiences of exile and good fortune in “The Tiger in the Attic,” a touching memoir of growing up as an outsider in a strange land.In this illuminating chronicle, Edith describes how she struggled to fit in and to conquer self-doubts about her German identity. Her realistic portrayal of the seemingly mundane yet historically momentous details of daily life during World War II slowly reveals istelf as a hopeful story about the kindness and generosity of strangers. She paints an account rich with colorful characters and intense relationships, uncanny close calls and unnerving bouts of luck that led to survival. Edith's journey between cultures continues with her final passage to America—yet another chapter in her life that required adjustment to a new world—allowing her, as she narrates it here, to visit her past as an exile all over again.“The Tiger in the Attic ”is a literary gem from a skilled fiction writer, the story of a thoughtful and observant child growing up against the backdrop of the most dangerous and decisive moment in modern European history. Offering a unique perspective on Holocaust studies, this book is both an exceptional and universal story of a young German-Jewish girl caught between worlds."Adjectives like 'audacious' and 'eloquent, ' 'enchanting' and 'exceptional'require rationing. . . . But what if the book demands these terms and more? Such is the case with “The Tiger in the Attic,” Edith Milton's marvelous memoi
White Field, Black Sheep: A Lithuanian-American LifeFrom $21.54
Her parents never really explained what a D.P. was. Years later Daiva Markelis learned that “displaced person” was the designation bestowed upon European refugees like her mom and dad who fled communist Lithuania after the war. Growing up in the Chicago suburb of Cicero, though, Markelis had only heard the name “T.P.,” since her folks pronounced the D as a T: “In first grade we had learned about the Plains Indians, who had lived in tent-like dwellings made of wood and buffalo skin called ”teepees." In my childish confusion, I thought that perhaps my parents weren't Lithuanian at all, but Cherokee. I went around telling people that I was the child of teepees.“ So begins this touching and affectionate memoir about growing up as a daughter of Lithuanian immigrants. Markelis was raised during the 1960s and 1970s in a household where Lithuanian was the first language. ”White Field, Black Sheep" derives much of its charm from this collision of old world and new: a tough but cultured generation that can't quite understand the ways of America and a younger one weaned on Barbie dolls and “The Brady Bunch,” Hostess cupcakes and comic books, “The Monkees” and “Captain Kangaroo.” Throughout, Markelis recalls the amusing contortions of language and identity that animated her childhood. She also humorously recollects the touchstones of her youth, from her First Communion to her first game of Twister. Ultimately, she revisits the troubles that surfaced in the wake of her assimilation into American culture: the constricting expectations of her family and community, her problems with alcoholism and depression, and her sometimes contentious but always loving relationship with her mother. Deftly recreating the emotional world of adolescence, but overlaying it with the hard-won understanding of adulthood, “White Field, Black Sheep” is a poignant and moving memoir—a live
Vivaldi: Voice of the BaroqueFrom $17
Vivaldi boasted that he could compose a concerto faster than a scribe could copy one. Despite his prolificacy, “The Four Seasons,” and the majority of his already published work had fallen into obscurity by the time of his death in poverty in 1741. Most of his music-concertos, sonatas, operas, and sacral music-has been published only recently.Very little has been written on Vivaldi for the nonspecialist, especially in English. Landon rediscovers the composer in this accessible and musically informed biography while presenting documentation of the musician's life discovered after the Baroque revival in the 1930s. This book includes illustrations of eighteenth-century Venice and several newly translated letters, thoroughly evoking the style of the time and revealing some of the more personal aspects of Vivaldi's life.“Belongs on the shelf of every serious music student.”—“Kirkus”"Gives a good feel for Vivaldi's life and times . . . and describes particularly well how Vivaldi has been revived."—“Booklist”“Robbins Landon is marvelously entertaining, extravagantly learned.”—“The Independent”
An Invitation to Laughter: A Lebanese Anthropologist in the Arab WorldFrom $33.99
For the late Fuad I. Khuri, a distinguished career as an anthropologist began not because of typical concerns like accessibility, money, or status, but because the very idea of an occupation that baffled his countrymen made them - and him - laugh. “When I tell them that 'anthropology' is my profession...they think I am either speaking a strange language or referring to a new medicine.” This profound appreciation for humor, especially in the contradictions inherent in the study of cultures, is a distinctive theme of “An Invitation to Laughter”, Khuri's astute memoir of life as an anthropologist in the Middle East. A Christian Lebanese, Khuri offers up in this unusual autobiography both an insider's and an outsider's perspective on life in Lebanon, elsewhere in the Middle East, and in West Africa. Khuri entertains and informs with clever insights into such issues as the mentality of Arabs toward women, eating habits of the Arab world, the impact of Islam on West Africa, and the extravagant lifestyles of wealthy Arabs, and even offers a vision for a type of democracy that could succeed in the Middle East.In his life and work, as these astonishing essays make evident, Khuri demonstrated how the discipline of anthropology continues to make a difference in bridging dangerous divides.
Killing Time: The Autobiography of Paul FeyerabendFrom $20.55
“Killing Time” is the story of Paul Feyerabend's life. Finished only weeks before his death in 1994, it is the self-portrait of one of this century's most original and influential intellectuals.Trained in physics and astronomy, Feyerabend was best known as a philosopher of science. But he emphatically was not a builder of theories or a writer of rules. Rather, his fame was in powerful, plain-spoken critiques of “big” science and “big” philosophy. Feyerabend gave voice to a radically democratic “epistemological anarchism: ” he argued forcefully that there is not one way to knowledge, but many principled paths; not one truth or one rationality but different, competing pictures of the workings of the world. “Anything goes,” he said about the ways of science in his most famous book, “Against Method.” And he meant it.Here, for the first time, Feyerabend traces the trajectory that led him from an isolated, lower-middle-class childhood in Vienna to the height of international academic success. He writes of his experience in the German army on the Russian front, where three bullets left him crippled, impotent, and in lifelong pain. He recalls his promising talent as an operatic tenor (a lifelong passion), his encounters with everyone from Martin Buber to Bertolt Brecht, innumerable love affairs, four marriages, and a career so rich he once held tenured positions at four universities at the same time.Although not written as an intellectual autobiography, “Killing Time” sketches the people, ideas, and conflicts of sixty years. Feyerabend writes frankly of complicated relationships with his mentor Karl Popper and his friend and frequent opponent Imre Lakatos, and his reactions to a growing reputation as the “worst enemy of science.”
Enemies of PromiseFrom $17.77
“Whom the gods wish to destroy,” writes Cyril Connolly, “they first call promising.” First published in 1938 and long out of print, “Enemies of Promise,” an “inquiry into the problem of how to write a book that lasts ten years,” tests the boundaries of criticism, journalism, and autobiography with the blistering prose that became Connolly's trademark. Connolly here confronts the evils of domesticity, politics, drink, and advertising as well as novelists such as Joyce, Proust, Hemingway, and Faulkner in essays that remain fresh and penetrating to this day."A fine critic, compulsive traveler, and candid autobiographer. . . . Connolly] lays down the law for all writers who wanted to count. . . . He had imagination and decisive images flashed with the speed of wit in his mind."—V. S. Pritchett, “New York”“ Review of Books”“ ”"Anyone who writes, or wants to write, will find something on just about every single page that either endorses a long-held prejudice or outrages, and that makes it a pretty compelling read. . . . You end up muttering back at just about every ornately constructed pensee that Connolly utters, but that's one of the joys of this book."—Nick Hornby, “The Believer”“A remarkable book.”—Anthony Powell
Undertones of WarFrom $15.46
"I took my road with no little pride of fear; one morning I feared very sharply, as I saw what looked like a rising shroud over a wooden cross in the clustering mist. Horror But on a closer study I realized that the apparition was only a flannel gas helmet. . . . What an age since 1914 “In ”Undertones of War,“ one of the finest autobiographies to come out of World War I, the acclaimed poet Edmund Blunden records his devastating experiences in combat. After enlisting at the age of twenty, he took part in the disastrous battles at the Somme, Ypres, and Passchendaele, describing them as ”murder, not only to the troops but to their singing faiths and hopes."All the horrors of trench warfare, all the absurdity and feeble attempts to make sense of the fighting, all the strangeness of observing war as a writer—of being simultaneously soldier and poet—pervade Blunden's memoir. In steely-eyed prose as richly allusive as any poetry, he tells of the endurance and despair found among the men of his battalion, including the harrowing acts of bravery that won him the Military Cross.Now back in print for American readers, the volume includes a selection of Blunden's war poems that unflinchingly juxtapose death in the trenches with the beauty of Flanders's fields. “Undertones of War ”deserves a place on anyone's bookshelf between Siegfried Sassoon's poetry and Robert Graves's “Goodbye to All That.”
Why be Happy When You Could be Normal?From $20.49
In 1985 Jeanette Winterson's first novel, “Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit”, was published. It tells the story of a young girl adopted by Pentecostal parents. The girl is supposed to grow up and be a missionary. Instead she falls in love with a woman. Disaster. Written when Jeanette was only twenty-five, her novel went on to win the Whitbread First Novel award, become an international bestseller and inspire an award-winning BBC television adaptation. “Oranges” was semi-autobiographical. Mrs Winterson, a thwarted giantess, loomed over that novel and its author's life. When Jeanette finally left her home, at sixteen, because she was in love with a woman, Mrs Winterson asked her: why be happy when you could be normal? This book is the story of a life's work to find happiness. It is a book full of stories: about a girl locked out of her home, sitting on the doorstep all night; about a tyrant in place of a mother, who has two sets of false teeth and a revolver in the duster drawer, waiting for Armageddon; about growing up in an northern industrial town now changed beyond recognition, part of a community now vanished; and, about the Universe as a Cosmic Dustbin.It is the story of how the painful past Jeanette Winterson thought she had written over and repainted returned to haunt her later life, and sent her on a journey into madness and out again, in search of her real mother. It is also a book about other people's stories, showing how fiction and poetry can form a string of guiding lights, a life-raft which supports us when we are sinking. Funny, acute, fierce and celebratory, this is a tough-minded search for belonging, for love, an identity, a home, and a mother.
People Who Eat DarknessFrom $20.28
Lucie Blackman - tall, blonde, and 21 years-old - stepped out into the vastness of Tokyo in the summer of 2000, and disappeared forever. The following winter, her dismembered remains were found buried in a seaside cave. The seven months in between had seen a massive search for the missing girl, involving Japanese policemen, British private detectives, Australian dowsers and Lucie's desperate, but bitterly divided, parents. As the case unfolded, it drew the attention of prime ministers and sado-masochists, ambassadors and con-men, and reporters from across the world. Had Lucie been abducted by a religious cult, or snatched by human traffickers? Who was the mysterious man she had gone to meet? And what did her work, as a 'hostess' in the notorious Roppongi disrtic of Tokyo, really involve? Richard Lloyd Parry, an award-winning foreign correspondent, has followed the case since Lucie's disappearance. Over the course of a decade, he has travelled to four continents to interview those caught up in the story, fought off a legal attack in the Japanese courts, and worked undercover as a barman in a Roppongi strip club.He has talked exhaustively to Lucie's friends and family and won unique access to the Japanese detectives who investigated the case. And he has delved into the mind and background of the man accused of the crime - Joji Obara, described by the judge as 'unprecedented and extremely evil'. With the finesse of a novelist, he reveals the astonishing truth about Lucie and her fate. People Who Eat Darkness is, by turns, a non-fiction thriller, a courtroom drama and the biography of both a victim and a killer. It is the story of a young woman who fell prey to unspeakabale evil, and of a loving family torn apart by grief. And it is a fascinating insight into one of the world's most baffling and mysterious societies, a light shone into dark