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Using Language to Persuade 2e is a fully revised edition of Oxford?s best selling VCE English title. Written to meet… more info
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Using Language to Persuade 2E is a fully revised edition of Oxfords bestselling VCE English title. Written to meet the… more info
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Indexing BooksFrom $39.77
Since 1994, Nancy Mulvany's “Indexing Books” has been the golden standard for thousands of professional indexers, editors, and authors. This long-awaited second edition, expanded and completely up-dated, will be equally revered. Like its predecessor, this edition of “Indexing Books” offers comprehensive, reliable treatment of indexing principles and practices relevant to authors and indexers alike. In addition to practical advice, the book presents a big-picture perspective on the nature and purpose of indexes and their role in published works. New to this edition are discussions of “information overload” and the role of the index, open-system versus closed-system indexing, electronic submission and display of indexes, and trends in software development, among other topics. Mulvany is equally comfortable focusing on the nuts and bolts of indexing - how to determine what is indexable, how to decide the depth of an index, and how to work with publisher instructions - and broadly surveying, as she does here, important sources of indexing guidelines such as The Chicago Manual of Style, Sun Microsystems, Oxford University Press, NISO TR03, and ISO 999.Authors will appreciate Mulvany's in-depth consideration of the costs and benefits of preparing one's own index versus hiring a professional, while professional indexers will value Mulvany's insights into computer-aided indexing. Helpful appendixes include resources for indexers, a worksheet for general index specifications, and a bibliography of sources to consult for further information on a range of topics. “Indexing Books” is both a practical guide and a manifesto about the vital role of the human-crafted index in the Information Age. As the standard indexing reference, it belongs on the shelves of everyone involved in writing and publishing nonfiction books.
Indexing BooksFrom $39.77
Since 1994, Nancy Mulvany's “Indexing Books” has been the golden standard for thousands of professional indexers, editors, and authors. This long-awaited second edition, expanded and completely up-dated, will be equally revered. Like its predecessor, this edition of “Indexing Books” offers comprehensive, reliable treatment of indexing principles and practices relevant to authors and indexers alike. In addition to practical advice, the book presents a big-picture perspective on the nature and purpose of indexes and their role in published works. New to this edition are discussions of “information overload” and the role of the index, open-system versus closed-system indexing, electronic submission and display of indexes, and trends in software development, among other topics. Mulvany is equally comfortable focusing on the nuts and bolts of indexing - how to determine what is indexable, how to decide the depth of an index, and how to work with publisher instructions - and broadly surveying, as she does here, important sources of indexing guidelines such as The Chicago Manual of Style, Sun Microsystems, Oxford University Press, NISO TR03, and ISO 999.Authors will appreciate Mulvany's in-depth consideration of the costs and benefits of preparing one's own index versus hiring a professional, while professional indexers will value Mulvany's insights into computer-aided indexing. Helpful appendixes include resources for indexers, a worksheet for general index specifications, and a bibliography of sources to consult for further information on a range of topics. “Indexing Books” is both a practical guide and a manifesto about the vital role of the human-crafted index in the Information Age. As the standard indexing reference, it belongs on the shelves of everyone involved in writing and publishing nonfiction books.
Bad News, Good News: Conversational Order in Everyday Talk and Clinical SettingsFrom $44.99
When we share or receive good or bad news, from ordinary events such as the birth of a child to public catastrophes such as 9/11, our “old” lives come to an end, and suddenly we enter a new world. In "Bad News, Good News, Douglas W. Maynard explores how we tell and hear such news, and what's similar and different about our social experiences when the tidings are bad rather than good or vice versa.Uncovering vocal and nonvocal patterns in everyday conversations, clinics, and other organizations, Maynard shows practices by which people give and receive good or bad news, how they come to realize the news and their new world, how they suppress or express their emotions, and how they construct social relationships through the sharing of news. He also reveals the implications of his study for understanding public affairs in which transmitting news may influence society at large, and he provides recommendations for professionals and others on how to deliver bad or good tidings more effectively.For anyone who wants to understand the interactional facets of news delivery and receipt and their social implications, "Bad News, Good News offers a wealth of scholarly insights and practical advice.
Bad News, Good News: Conversational Order in Everyday Talk and Clinical SettingsFrom $44.99
When we share or receive good or bad news, from ordinary events such as the birth of a child to public catastrophes such as 9/11, our “old” lives come to an end, and suddenly we enter a new world. In "Bad News, Good News, Douglas W. Maynard explores how we tell and hear such news, and what's similar and different about our social experiences when the tidings are bad rather than good or vice versa.Uncovering vocal and nonvocal patterns in everyday conversations, clinics, and other organizations, Maynard shows practices by which people give and receive good or bad news, how they come to realize the news and their new world, how they suppress or express their emotions, and how they construct social relationships through the sharing of news. He also reveals the implications of his study for understanding public affairs in which transmitting news may influence society at large, and he provides recommendations for professionals and others on how to deliver bad or good tidings more effectively.For anyone who wants to understand the interactional facets of news delivery and receipt and their social implications, "Bad News, Good News offers a wealth of scholarly insights and practical advice.
The Encyclopedia of ChicagoFrom $74.14
One of the great American metropolises, Chicago rises out of the prairie in the heart of the country, buffeted by winds coming off the plains and cooled by the waters of the inland sea of Lake Michigan. Chicago is a city of size and mass, the cradle of modern architecture, the freight hub of the nation, a city built on slaughterhouses and cacophonous financial trading tempered by some of the finest cultural institutions in the world. While many histories have been written of the city, none can claim the scope and breadth of the long-awaited “Encyclopedia of Chicago.”Developed by the Newberry Library with the cooperation of the Chicago Historical Society, “The Encyclopedia of Chicago” is the definitive historical reference on metropolitan Chicago. More than a decade in the making, the “Encyclopedia” brings together hundreds of historians, journalists, and experts on everything from airlines to Zoroastrians to explore all aspects of the rich world of Chicagoland, from its geological prehistory to the present.The main alphabetical section of the “Encyclopedia, ” comprising more than 1,400 entries, covers the full range of Chicago's neighborhoods, suburbs, and ethnic groups, as well as the city's cultural institutions, technology and science, architecture, religions, immigration, transportation, business history, labor, music, health and medicine, and hundreds of other topics. The “Encyclopedia” has the widest geographical reach of any city encyclopedia of its kind, encompassing eight of the region's counties, including suburbs. Nearly 400 thumbnail maps pinpoint Chicago neighborhoods and suburban municipalities; these maps are complemented by hundreds of black-and-white and color photographs and thematic maps that bring the history of metropolitan Chicago to life. Additionally, contributors have provided lengthy interpretive essays—woven into the alphabetical
The Craft of ResearchFrom $19.09
With more than 400,000 copies now in print, “The Craft of Research ”is the unrivaled resource for researchers at every level, from first-year undergraduates to research reporters at corporations and government offices. Seasoned researchers and educators Gregory G. Colomb and Joseph M. Williams present an updated third edition of their classic handbook, whose first and second editions were written in collaboration with the late Wayne C. Booth. “The Craft of Research” explains how to build an argument that motivates readers to accept a claim; how to anticipate the reservations of readers and to respond to them appropriately; and how to create introductions and conclusions that answer that most demanding question, "So what?" The third edition includes an expanded discussion of the essential early stages of a research task: planning and drafting a paper. The authors have revised and fully updated their section on electronic research, emphasizing the need to distinguish between trustworthy sources (such as those found in libraries) and less reliable sources found with a quick Web search. A chapter on warrants has also been thoroughly reviewed to make this difficult subject easier for researchers Throughout, the authors have preserved the amiable tone, the reliable voice, and the sense of directness that have made this book indispensable for anyone undertaking a research project.
Writing for Social Scientists: How to Start and Finish Your Thesis, Book, or Article: Second EditiFrom $13.97
Students and researchers all write under pressure, and those pressures—most lamentably, the desire to impress your audience rather than to communicate with them—often lead to pretentious prose, academic posturing, and, not infrequently, writer's block.Sociologist Howard S. Becker has written “the” classic book on how to conquer these pressures and simply write. First published nearly twenty years ago, “Writing for Social Scientists” has become a lifesaver for writers in all fields, from beginning students to published authors. Becker's message is clear: in order to learn how to write, take a deep breath and then begin writing. Revise. Repeat.It is not always an easy process, as Becker wryly relates. Decades of teaching, researching, and writing have given him plenty of material, and Becker neatly exposes the foibles of academia and its “publish or perish” atmosphere. Wordiness, the passive voice, inserting a “the way in which” when a simple “how” will do—all these mechanisms are a part of the social structure of academic writing. By shrugging off such impediments—or at the very least, putting them aside for a few hours—we can reform our work habits and start writing lucidly without worrying about grades, peer approval, or the “literature.”In this new edition, Becker takes account of major changes in the computer tools available to writers today, and also substantially expands his analysis of how academic institutions create problems for them. As competition in academia grows increasingly heated, “Writing for Social Scientists” will provide solace to a new generation of frazzled, would-be writers.
Great Northern?From $21.98
You either are a Swallows' and Amazons' fan, eagerly awaiting every new book by Arthur Ransome, or you aren't. I happen to qualify, so perhaps I am prejudiced. Anyhow, here's another book about a seafaring holiday in the Hebrides, with Dick, least aggressive of the crowd, as central figure, in his role as Naturalist. The usual nautical adventure, so accurately termed that even the most critical can find no fault; some shore excitement, as the youngsters run afoul of the natives, and are accused of disturbing the game; and finally, the story culminates in an exciting pitting of wits against an unscrupulous egg-collector, determined to raid the nest of the Great Northern Diver, which Dick has spotted. Lively story for children who like boats- and the personalities of the boys and girls cruising with Uncle Jim are familiar to faithful followers. (Kirkus Reviews)
The Big SixFrom $26.2
It's great detective work that's needed now. Bill, Peter and Joe are falsely accused of setting boats adrift and the whole river is against them. Only Dick, Dorothea and Tom Dudgeon are there to stand by their friends and they soon set to work to investigate the crimes and trap the real criminals.
Secret WaterFrom $25.81
John, Susan, Titty and Roger, the crew of the Swallow, take on the job of mapping the mass of small islands round Pin Mill while living on the biggest one. But who are the mysterious savages who lurk in the islands - and is the tribal totem they find in their campsite a threat of attack...?