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  1. When the first convoys of the ANZAC Expeditionary Forces sailed from Albany’s majestic King George Sound in November and December 1914, they carried with them hundreds of horses. Many had been loaded in ports elsewhere in Australia and New Zealand. Some came from unexpected places, including Juna Downs, a vast pastoral station in Western Australia’s remote Pilbara region. Over 130,000 Australian horses were to serve our forces, around 70,000 were to die overseas in the line of duty, and only one was to return home. What was the fate of up to 50,000 Australian horses that were still alive when guns became silent in 1918? This is the extraordinary story of Australia’s war horses – where they came from, where they served and what became of those that had survived when Great War hostilities ceased in 1918.
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  2. The simple and easy way to get your mind around Australia’s military history More people are visiting Gallipoli and walking the Kokoda Trail each year – now find out why. This complete guide helps you trace the story of Australia’s involvement in war, from the colonial conflicts with the Indigenous population, through the World Wars to peacekeeping initiatives in East Timor and the controversial conflict in Afghanistan. Find out the origins of Australia’s military history – go all the way back to the arrival of the First Fleet and the conflicts with the Indigenous peoples Learn about the heroism of the Anzacs – discover the origins of the legend of Gallipoli, and how the brass bungled the campaign Discover the horrors of war – consider the suffering and huge losses on the Western Front Recognise the successful battles of World Wars I and II – follow the Diggers’ exploits in Palestine and Syria, and at Tobruk and Alamein Marvel at the grim jungle battles – track the Diggersthrough New Guinea, Borneo, Malaya and Vietnam between 1942 and 1972 Admire Australia’s efforts to repel possible invaders – learn how Australians defended their country against the Japanese during World War II See how the Cold War heated up – witness the fight against communism in the Korean and Vietnam Wars Appreciate the modern-day Australian Defence Force – acknowledge the courage of the men and women who protectus into the 21st century Open the book and find: New insights into the meaning of Anzac Day Simple explanations of the structure of Australia’s military Details of who fought whom, where, when and why Stories of Australia’s great military fighters and leaders Accounts of the iconic battles that established Australia’s reputation Locations of Australia’s peacekeeping operations around the world Ways in which war and conflict have shaped the nation Reasons why Australia goes to war Learn to: Comprehend the impact of waron Australia Appreciate the heroism at AnzacCove and other significant
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  3. Lion & Kangaroo is one of Australia�s great works of history, a rich chronicle of the nation�s coming-of-age. With intelligence, wisdom and wit, acclaimed historian Gavin Souter captures all the milestones of Australia�s first decades, from the...
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  4. In Volume II of The Story of Australia's People, Geoffrey Blainey continues his account of the history of this country from the early Gold Rush to the present day, completing the story of our nation and its people. When Europeans crossed...
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  5. This book is the first to draw extensively on the recently released highly classified notes of the cabinet room discussions of successive Australian Governments from 1950 to the mid-1970s and details the changing attitude of the nation’s leaders towards the place of Papua New Guinea in Australia’s defence and security outlook. The Cabinet Notebooks provide an uncensored and unprecedented insight into the opinion of Australia’s leaders towards Indonesia under Sukarno, Southeast Asia and Indo China in general, the changing nature of relations with Britain and the United States and, finally, towards Papua New Guinea. The cabinet room discussions reveal attitudes towards Asia and Australia’s place in the region more nuanced, varied and sensitive than previously known. They also illustrate the dominant influence of Prime Minister Robert Menzies and Deputy Prime Minister John McEwen in shaping Australia’s response to the critical events of this time. Australia’s Northern Shield? shows how, since colonial times, Australia has assessed the importance of Papua New Guinea by examining the ambitions of and threats from external sources, principally Imperial Germany, Japan, and Indonesia. It examines the significant change in Australia’s attitude as this region approached independence in 1975, amid concerns as to the new nation’s future stability and unity. The terms of Australia’s longterm defence undertaking are examined in detail and an examination is offered also of the most recent attempts to define the strategic importance of Papua New Guinea to Australia.Click here to read a review of Australia’s Northern Shield? in The Australian.
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  6. Hunter. Worker. Legend. The untold story of the dog’s role in building our nation. Everyoneknows Australia rode on the sheep’s back. But do they know just how much those sheep depended on the dog? Working dogs made a huge contribution tothe success of the Australian wool and beef industries. Indeed, they provided the means to feed a starving colony; guard fledgling colonial agricultural enterprises; and extend a sheep and beef industry that fed the world. Never hasAustralia had a workforce that asked for so little and yet produced so much. The Dogs That Made Australia is a vividand meticulously researched history of Australia told through the story of thedingo, the dogs that were imported and bred here, and the humans who loved, feared and worked them.
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  7. The vast continent of Australia was settled in two main streams, far apart in time and origin. The first came ashore some 50,000 years ago when the islands of Australia, Tasmania and New Guinea were one. The second began to arrive from Europe at the end of the eighteenth century. Each had to come to terms with the land they found, and each had to make sense of the other. The long Aboriginal occupation of Australia witnessed spectacular changes. The rising of the seas isolated the continent and preserved a nomadic way of life, while agriculture was revolutionising other parts of the world. Over millennia, the Aboriginal people mastered the land’s climates, seasons and resources. Traditional Aboriginal life came under threat the moment Europeans crossed the world to plant a new society in an unknown land. That land in turn rewarded, tricked, tantalised and often defeated the new arrivals. The meeting of the two cultures is one of the most difficult and complex meetings in recorded history. In this book Professor Geoffrey Blainey returns first to the subject of his celebrated works on Australian history, Triumph of the Nomads (1975) and A Land Half Won (1980), retelling the story of our history up until 1850 in light of the latest research. He has changed his view about vital aspects of the Indigenous and early British history of this land, and looked at other aspects for the first time. Compelling, groundbreaking and brilliantly readable, The Story of Australia’s People- The Rise and Fall of Ancient Australia is the first instalment of an ambitious two-part work, and the culmination of the lifework of Australia’s most prolific and wide-ranging historian. ‘Absorbing and important … the first volume of an ambitious work on the peopling of this continent from its human origins to our own day…bold, rich, wise, authioritative and questioning.’ Peter Stanley, The Age ‘The Story of Australia’s People- The Rise and Fall of Ancient Australia situates pre-invasion Aboriginal so
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  8. It is the duty of historians to be, wherever they can, accurate, precise, humane, imaginative - using moral imagination above all - and even-handed.The first of three volumes of the landmark,...
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  9. 'It is the duty of historians to be, wherever they can, accurate, precise, humane, imaginative - using moral imagination above all � and even-handed.' - Alan AtkinsonThe second of three...
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  10. In Australia, the elements dominate our senses. Fire, Earth, Wind, and Water � they bring awe, silence, fear, contemplation, beauty, all at once. Australia Elements presents the creation and identity of today�s Australia through its...
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  11. In this fully revised third edition of Australia�s Welfare Wars, Philip Mendes questions many of the key values and assumptions that determine contemporary social welfare policies, and the factors and forces that shape these policies...
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  12. In one volume here is everything you need to conduct fieldwork in archaeology. The Archaeologist's Field Handbook is designed for every kind of archaeological practice, from simple site recordings to professional consultancies and anyone who wants...
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  13. I became an urban historian because I believed that our cities deserved more of our curiosity and idealism.City Dreamers restores Australian cities, and those who created them,...
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  14. From Captain Cook's globe to Mabo's map, and Melba's frock to Cathy Freeman's running suit, this is Australia's history told through a gallery of things. Former Rolling Stone editor Toby Creswell has curated an illustrated popular history of...
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  15. First there was Girt. Now comes ... True Girt In this side-splitting sequel to his best-selling history, David Hunt takes us to the Australian frontier. This was the Wild South, home to hardy...
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  16. Foreword by Germaine Greer In What Do We Want! Clive Hamilton explores the colourful, enthralling and stirring forms of protest...
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  17. WEH Stanner was a public intellectual whose work reached beyond the walls of the academy, and he remains a highly significant figure in Aboriginal affairs and Australian anthropology. He contributed much to public understandings of the Dreaming and the significance of Aboriginal religion. His 1968 Boyer Lectures, After the Dreaming, continue to be among the most widely quoted works in the field of Aboriginal studies. He also produced some exceptionally evocative biographical portraits of Aboriginal people. Stanner’s writings on post-colonial development and assimilation policy urged an appreciation of Indigenous people’s distinctive world views and aspirations.
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  18. From Hugh Edwards, one of the discoverers of the wreck of the Batavia, comes Islands of Angry Ghosts, an expert and compelling look at one of the most horrific maritime incidents in Australian history. A fascinating story, in print since 1966, Islands of Angry Ghosts is a story in two parts. It traces and re-creates the final months of the Batavia and her crew, pieced together through journals, letters and trial records. It also follows the discovery and salvage of Batavia’s wreck by Hugh Edwards and a crew of divers. In 1629, the Dutch East India merchantman the Batavia was wrecked on reef islands off the West Australian coast while on a routine trip to Indonesia. What followed this disaster is a harrowing tale of desertion, betrayal and murder. More than 125 men, women and children were murdered by mutineers caught in a frenzy of bloodlust and greed. By the time the rescue ship finally arrived, months later, the marooned were caught in a desperate battle between soldiers trying to defend the survivors and the mutineers who were bent on leaving no witnesses. More than three hundred years later, Hugh Edwards, a West Australian reporter and diving enthusiast, started to search for the lost ship. When Edwards and his team found the Batavia, they discovered the final piece of a story that has gripped Australians for over a century.
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  19. At least thirty-seven per cent of male convicts and fifteen per cent of female convicts were tattooed by the time they arrived in the penal colonies, making Australians quite possibly the world’s most heavily tattooed English-speaking people of the nineteenth century. Each convict’s details, including their tattoos, were recorded when they disembarked, providing an extensive physical account of Australia’s convict men and women. Simon Barnard has meticulously combed through those records to reveal a rich pictorial history. Convict Tattoos explores various aspects of tattooing-from the symbolism of tattoo motifs to inking methods, from their use as means of identification and control to expressions of individualism and defiance-providing a fascinating glimpse of the lives of the people behind the records.
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