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  1. The publication of this book in 1981 profoundly changed the way in which we understand the history of relations between indigenous Australians and European settlers. It has since become a classic of Australian history. Drawing from documentary and oral evidence, the book describes in meticulous and compelling detail the ways in which Aborigines responded to the arrival of Europeans. Henry Reynolds’ argument that the Aborigines resisted fiercely was highly original when it was first published and is no less challenging today.
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  2. Australia is the last continent to be settled by Europeans, but it also sustains a people and a culture tens of thousands years old. For much of the past 225 years the newcomers have sought to replace the old with the new. This book tells how they imposed themselves on the land and describes how they brought technology, institutions and ideas to make it their own. The fourth edition incorporates the far-reaching effects of an export and investment boom in the early years of the twenty-first century that lifted Australia to unprecedented prosperity. The sale of minerals and energy enabled the economy to withstand the global financial crisis of 2007-08 but there was no agreement on how the wealth was to be managed and its benefits distributed. The book describes a continuing search for solutions to climate change, the unauthorised arrival of refugees, Indigenous disadvantage and generational change.
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  3. It is the duty of historians to be, wherever they can, accurate, precise, humane, imaginative - using moral imagination above all - and even-handed.The first of three volumes of the landmark,...
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  4. In one volume here is everything you need to conduct fieldwork in archaeology. The Archaeologist's Field Handbook is designed for every kind of archaeological practice, from simple site recordings to professional consultancies and anyone who wants...
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  5. The vast continent of Australia was settled in two main streams, far apart in time and origin. The first came ashore some 50,000 years ago when the islands of Australia, Tasmania and New Guinea were one. The second began to arrive from Europe at the end of the eighteenth century. Each had to come to terms with the land they found, and each had to make sense of the other. The long Aboriginal occupation of Australia witnessed spectacular changes. The rising of the seas isolated the continent and preserved a nomadic way of life, while agriculture was revolutionising other parts of the world. Over millennia, the Aboriginal people mastered the land’s climates, seasons and resources. Traditional Aboriginal life came under threat the moment Europeans crossed the world to plant a new society in an unknown land. That land in turn rewarded, tricked, tantalised and often defeated the new arrivals. The meeting of the two cultures is one of the most difficult and complex meetings in recorded history. In this book Professor Geoffrey Blainey returns first to the subject of his celebrated works on Australian history, Triumph of the Nomads (1975) and A Land Half Won (1980), retelling the story of our history up until 1850 in light of the latest research. He has changed his view about vital aspects of the Indigenous and early British history of this land, and looked at other aspects for the first time. Compelling, groundbreaking and brilliantly readable, The Story of Australia’s People- The Rise and Fall of Ancient Australia is the first instalment of an ambitious two-part work, and the culmination of the lifework of Australia’s most prolific and wide-ranging historian. ‘Absorbing and important … the first volume of an ambitious work on the peopling of this continent from its human origins to our own day…bold, rich, wise, authioritative and questioning.’ Peter Stanley, The Age ‘The Story of Australia’s People- The Rise and Fall of Ancient Australia situates pre-invasion Aboriginal so
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  6. By February 1942 the Japanese had invaded the Dutch East Indies as part of their push south. All that stood in the way of their moving significant resources to take part in the main fighting in Papua New Guinea was a force of 700 Australian commandos and a few hundred Dutch soldiers. After months of skirmishes and attacks on Japanese forces, the Australians faced a major offensive and despite the best efforts of the individual soldiers, Australian forces were withdrawn at the end of 1942. But by then an entire Japanese division had been prevented from taking part in the Papua New Guinea campaign. THE MEN WHO CAME OUT OF THE GROUND tells the story of the heroic fighting, courage and ingenuity in the face of supply and equipment problems, and the support and friendship of the locals. It’s the story of Australia’s Special Forces in action and achieving what they set out to do.
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  7. `Aperceptive, balanced, wide-ranging interpretation of the evolution of modernAustralia which is both erudite and well-written’ – Duncan Bythell JohnRickard’s Australia: A Cultural History, firstpublished in 1988, is still the only short history of Australia from a culturalperspective. It has also acquired a reputation as an introduction to thedevelopment of Australian society and was listed by the historian and publicintellectual John Hirst in his `First XI: The best Australian history books’. Althougharranged chronologically, this book is not a chronicle, still less a laboriousdetailing of governors and governments: rather, it focuses on the transmissionof values, beliefs, and customs amongst the diverse mix of peoples who aretoday’s Australians. The story begins with sixty thousand years of Aboriginal presence and their continuing material and spiritual relationshipwith the land, and takes the reader through the turbulent years of Britishcolonisation and the emergence, through prosperity, war, and depression, of thecultural accommodations which have been distinctively Australian. This third edition concludes with a critical review of the challenges facing contemporaryAustralia and warns readers that `we may get the future we deserve’.
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  8. Featuring accounts of courage, determination and endurance, The Tin Ticket takes readers to the dawn of the nineteenth century, and explores the lives of women arrested and sent into slavery in Australia and Tasmania. Discarded by Britain, they arrived as little more than property, but succeeded in forging new identities. This is a must-read for anyone with an interest in Australian history or the development of women’s rights. All of those featured played an important role in the shaping of a continent.
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  9. In October 1943 Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Josef Stalin signed a solemn pact that once their enemies were defeated the Allied powers would ‘pursue them to the uttermost ends of the earth and will deliver them to their accusers in order that justice may be done’. Nowhere did they say that justice would be selective. But it would prove to be.TRAITORS outlines the treachery of the British, American and Australian governments, who turned a blind eye to those who experimented on Australian prisoners of war. Journalist and bestselling author Frank Walker details how Nazis hired by ASIO were encouraged to settle in Australia and how the Catholic Church, CIA and MI6 helped the worst Nazi war criminals escape justice. While our soldiers were asked to risk their lives for King and country, Allied corporations traded with the enemy; Nazi and Japanese scientists were enticed to work for Australia, the US and UK; and Australia’s own Hollywood hero Errol Flynn was associating with Nazi spies. The extraordinary revelations in TRAITORS detail the ugly side of war and power and the many betrayals of our ANZACs. After reading this book you can’t help but wonder, what else did they hide?
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  10. For over 200 years Australia’s official history has focused on English colonisation and `discovery’, with tales of British explorers and first generation white Australians navigating the vast and unfriendly land. But what of the millennia before the English claimed Australia as their own and wrote the history books. 1787 traces the journey of Australia before the infamous 1788 date, to explore just how `discovered’ the southern continent was by not only the Indigenous Australians who had lived and prospered for thousands of years, but also the sailors, traders, fishermen and many others who had visited our shores. This is not about voyages of `discovery’, cartography, geography, or hero-captains and their sailing ship adventures. This is a bigger history-of the rise and fall of empires, the shifts in global economies, and their impact on Australia. By charting the encounters with Australia and its original people by several major groups of visitors, primarily the Portuguese, Dutch, Malay, French, and British from the late Middle Ages, 1787 reveals the stories of first encounters between Indigenous Australians and foreigners, placing Indigenous Australians back into our known history rather than a timeless pre-historical one. It’s a fascinating story that shifts focus away from post-colonial history and engages the reader in the eventful and lively stories of Australia as a vast and active land participating in a global history.
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  11. The events featured in this book changed Australia and have the nation what it is today. Events that Shaped Australia sets out the detail, the people, the images and the after effects of the most important turning points in our nation’s history. Starting with the formation of Gondwanaland and the arrival of indigenous Australians, this book features events in such eras as European colonisation, the Gold Rush, Federation, two World Wars and the later part of the 20th Century. Moving into the new millennium, the Bali Bombings, the Tampa controversy and the Rudd-Gillard-Abbott government crises are all featured. Events that Shaped Australia features rare colour and black and white photographs, as well as maps, documents and illustrations brought to life by well researched and accessible narratives.
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  12. The simple and easy way to get your mind around Australia’s military history More people are visiting Gallipoli and walking the Kokoda Trail each year – now find out why. This complete guide helps you trace the story of Australia’s involvement in war, from the colonial conflicts with the Indigenous population, through the World Wars to peacekeeping initiatives in East Timor and the controversial conflict in Afghanistan. Find out the origins of Australia’s military history – go all the way back to the arrival of the First Fleet and the conflicts with the Indigenous peoples Learn about the heroism of the Anzacs – discover the origins of the legend of Gallipoli, and how the brass bungled the campaign Discover the horrors of war – consider the suffering and huge losses on the Western Front Recognise the successful battles of World Wars I and II – follow the Diggers’ exploits in Palestine and Syria, and at Tobruk and Alamein Marvel at the grim jungle battles – track the Diggersthrough New Guinea, Borneo, Malaya and Vietnam between 1942 and 1972 Admire Australia’s efforts to repel possible invaders – learn how Australians defended their country against the Japanese during World War II See how the Cold War heated up – witness the fight against communism in the Korean and Vietnam Wars Appreciate the modern-day Australian Defence Force – acknowledge the courage of the men and women who protectus into the 21st century Open the book and find: New insights into the meaning of Anzac Day Simple explanations of the structure of Australia’s military Details of who fought whom, where, when and why Stories of Australia’s great military fighters and leaders Accounts of the iconic battles that established Australia’s reputation Locations of Australia’s peacekeeping operations around the world Ways in which war and conflict have shaped the nation Reasons why Australia goes to war Learn to: Comprehend the impact of waron Australia Appreciate the heroism at AnzacCove and other significant
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  13. The war with the Ottoman Empire was a war not only between great empires but about empire and the furthering of European imperial interests, and its aftermath laid the foundations of the modern Middle East. Soldiers from Britain, Australia, New Zealand, India and other parts of the British Empire all fought in various theatres in the Dardanelles, Sinai, Palestine, Syria and Mesopotamia and played an important, though never decisive, role in several of them. The Australian Imperial Force was a relatively small part of a much larger imperial military machine, and without the resources of the British Army and its willingness to expend them in a sustained manner on the various Dominion forces the latter could have achieved little.This book examines the involvement of Australians in this part of the Great War, but does so in a wider context in order to more fully understand the real importance of these complex events and Australia’s part in them.Drawing on archival records in Australasia, Europe and North America, The War with the Ottoman Empire provides a fresh perspective on Australia’s involvement in the Great War and our place in the world as empires shifted.The Centenary History of Australia and the Great War Series:Volume 1: Australia and the War in the Air – AvailableVolume 3: The War with Germany – AvailableVolume 4: The War at Home – AvailableVolume 5: The Australian Imperial Force – Available
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  14. A passionate portrayal of Australia’s social awakening – the people, the politics, and the power of the student press. The 1960s was a decade of profound change, marked by an accumulating tension between political conservatism and social restlessness. During this time, university campuses became sites of dissent, amplified by the proliferation of tertiary institutions, producing the best-educated generation in Australian history. Student newspapers began probing the Vietnam War and resisting conscription, challenging racism and the absence of Aborigines at university, stirring gender politics, and testing the limits of obscenity. With erudition, wit, and daring creativity – and enabled by new printing technology – student newspapers played an immensely important role in Australia’s social, cultural, and political transformation, the results of which still resonate throughout Australia today. In Dissent, historian Sally Percival Wood encapsulates the spirit of the era, delving into the people, the places, and the politics of the time to reveal how this transformation took place. From 1961, when Monash University opened, to 1972, when the Whitlam government came to power, Dissent shows just how profoundly the political conservatism emblematic of post-war Australia struggled to adapt to this new generation, with its new, sometimes alarming, audacity – and goes on to ask- has the student press lost its nerve?
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  15. The Vietnam War was Australia’s longest and most controversial military commitment of the twentieth century, ending in humiliation for theUnited States and its allies with the downfall of South Vietnam. The war provoked deep divisions in Australian society and politics, particularlysince for the first time young men were conscripted for overseas service in a highly contentious ballot system. The Vietnam era is still identified with diplomatic, military and political failure. Was Vietnam a case of Australia fighting `other people’s wars’? Were we really `all the way’ with the United States? How valid was the `domino theory’? Did the Australian forces develop new tactical methods in earlier Southeast Asian conflicts, and just how successful were they against the unyielding enemy in Vietnam? In this landmark book, award-winning historian Peter Edwards skilfully unravels the complexities of the global Cold War, decolonisation in Southeast Asia and Australian domestic politics to provide new, often surprising, answers to these questions.
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  16. Jacaranda will be publishing a 2nd edition of Jacaranda Retroactive 2 Stage 5 for the NSW Australian curriculum in 2017 for use in 2018. The updated title will be available as print or a new eBook powered by learnON, the immersive digital learning platform. Please visit the Jacaranda NSW Australian curriculum History page for more information. Retroactive 2 NSW Australian curriculum History Stage 5 The Making of the Mordern World and Australia with eBookPLUS The Retroactive series continues to set the standard in providing a complete resource package for the New South Wales 7-10 History Syllabus. Fully updated and with engaging new content to comprehensively address the requirements of the new NSW syllabus for the Australian curriculum, the Retroactive text and eBookPLUS provide in-depth coverage of every Overview and Depth Study topic – including two starter units for School Developed Topics on The Holocaust and Australia in the Vietnam War era – allowing teachers and students to choose the studies they wish to explore. With stunning visual appeal and exciting digital resources, and supplemented by quality teacher resources in the eGuidePLUS, the Retroactive series is designed to fully support teachers and engage and inspire students. The Retroactive series develops students’ understanding of key historical concepts and inquiry skills. Students and teachers can be assured of a comprehensive and authoritative coverage of the Stage 5 `The making of the Modern World and Australia’ content and historical skills. Features of Retroactive 2 Australian curriculum History – Stage 5: The Making of the Modern World and Australia include: * In-depth coverage of all syllabus content * Integrated history skills, including a varied and stimulating range of source-based activities, plus a Skill builder feature within topics to develop students’ skills in historical inquiry * Content in manageable, thematically organised sections that link directly to syllabus points * Clear text w
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  17. Across Australia, early Europeans commented again and again that the land looked like a park. With extensive grassy patches and pathways, open woodlands and abundant wildlife, it evoked a country estate in England. Bill Gammage has discovered this was because Aboriginal people managed the land in a far more systematic and scientific fashion than we have ever realised. For over a decade, Gammage has examined written and visual records of the Australian landscape. He has uncovered an extraordinarily complex system of land management using fire and the life cycles of native plants to ensure plentiful wildlife and plant foods throughout the year. We know Aboriginal people spent far less time and effort than Europeans in securing food and shelter, and now we know how they did it. With details of land-management strategies from around Australia, The Biggest Estate on Earth rewrites the history of this continent, with huge implications for us today. Once Aboriginal people were no longer able to tend their country, it became overgrown and vulnerable to the hugely damaging bushfires we now experience. And what we think of as virgin bush in a national park is nothing of the kind.
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  18. Clare Wright’s award-winning research challenges the myth that the Australian pub is a male domain, revealing the enduring and dynamic presence of female publicans behind the bar. Wright takes the reader on a pub crawl through this history- from Sarah Bird, the 27-year-old convict who was Australia’s first female licensee, to Big Poll the Grog Seller, the miners’ darling on the goldfields, to Cheryl Barassi and Dawn Fraser in recent years. Handsomely illustrated and weaving oral history interviews, archival sources, folk songs, bush ballads and other popular literature throughout the narrative, this groundbreaking book exposes the remarkable visibility and dominance of women in Austalian hotel-keeping culture.
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