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  1. The latest Christmas book from the million-selling New Scientist series.It's lucky you're here. But for a series of choices, accidents and coincidences - any of which could have gone otherwise - your life would have been very different. The same goes for reality. We live in just one of many possible worlds - but we can imagine parallel universes in which dinosaurs still rule the Earth, the Russians got to the moon first, everyone's a vegetarian or time itself flows backwards. And that's just for starters. What if the laws of physics were different? What if robots become smarter than us? Or, if every human on the planet simply vanished tomorrow? The answers to these questions aren't just fun to consider, but reveal deep truths about our own universe.Join New Scientist on a thrilling journey through dozens of incredible but perfectly possible alternative realities, thought experiments and counterfactual histories - each shining a surprising and unexpected spotlight on life as we know it.About the AuthorSince the first magazine was published in 1956, New Scientist has established a world-beating reputation for exploring and uncovering the latest developments and discoveries in science and technology, placing them in context and exploring what they mean for the future. Each week through a variety of different channels, including print, online, social media and more, New Scientist reaches over four million highly engaged readers - over a million readers for the print magazine alone.
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  2. Maths Quest 8 for NSW Australian Curriculum Edition & eBookPLUS has been written specifically to meet the requirements of the NSW Australian Curriculum. The Mathematics Syllabus focuses on students Working Mathematically in the strands of Fluency, Understanding, Reasoning, Problem-Solving and Communicating. KEY FEATURES •Â Problem Solving chapters to provide students with opportunities to apply their knowledge out of the context of defined topics•Â NAPLAN practice questions•Â Links to assessON, our innovative online tool that provides additional assessment resources for your mathematics course and enables online assessments FOR, AS and OF learning and automatic feedback•Â Links to SpyClass for Maths Quest 8, a captivating online comic-style game where students complete a range of missions •Â Individual pathways: All exercises within the text are carefully graded so that students get to work at their own level. At the start of each exercise a guide to Individual pathways is provided. Individual Pathway Activities are available on the eBookPLUS to provide additional opportunities for students to engage with relevant mathematical concepts at their own level.•Â A language section to provide students with opportunities to use mathematical language in context and to enhance their literacy skills•Â A rich task/Investigation (Communication) to provide students with opportunities to explore and apply mathematical ideas beyond the level of skill•Â Chapter Challenges to provide students with opportunities to think beyond the obvious and the concrete•Â Puzzles to engage students and provide them with opportunities to learn through fun activitiesMaths Quest 8 for NSW Australian Curriculum Edition & eBookPLUS is a hard-copy student text accompanied by the eBookPLUS. eBookPLUS resources include: •Â Access from any digital device: PC/MAC/iPad/Android Tablet.•Â Worksheets - Word documents designed for easy customisation a
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  3. From Stonehenge to beyond the Big Bang, an exhilarating scientific exploration of how we make time Time is the grandest conception of the universe that we humans have been able to imagine – and its most intimate, the very frame of human life. In About Time, astrophysicist and award-winning writer Adam Frank tells the scientific story of this wonderful and tyrannical invention. A Palaeolithic farmer moved through the sun-fuelled day and star-steered night in a radically different way than the Elizabethan merchants who set their pace to the clocks newly installed in their town squares. Since then, science has swept time into increasingly minute and standardized units – the industrial efficiency of ironworks’ punch clocks; the space-age precision of atomic fountains and GPS satellites; the fifteen-minute increments of Outlook’s digital revolution. And in the past decade, string-theory branes, multiverses, and “clockless” physics have begun to overturn our ideas about how the universe began – the Big Bang – in ways that will completely rewrite time and our experience of it. Weaving cosmology with day-to-day chronicles and a down-to-earth style, About Time is both dazzling and riveting as it confronts what comes next.
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  4. For most people, quantum theory is a byword for mysterious, impenetrable science. And yet for many years it was equally baffling for scientists themselves. In this magisterial book, Manjit Kumar gives a dramatic and superbly-written history of this fundamental scientific revolution, and the divisive debate at its core. Quantum theory looks at the very building blocks of our world, the particles and processes without which it could not exist. Yet for 60 years most physicists believed that quantum theory denied the very existence of reality itself. In this tour de force of science history, Manjit Kumar shows how the golden age of physics ignited the greatest intellectual debate of the twentieth century. Quantum theory is weird.In 1905, Albert Einstein suggested that light was a particle, not a wave, defying a century of experiments. Werner Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and Erwin Schrodinger’s famous dead-and-alive cat are similarly strange. As Niels Bohr said, if you weren’t shocked by quantum theory, you didn’t really understand it. While ‘Quantum’ sets the science in the context of the great upheavals of the modern age, Kumar’s centrepiece is the conflict between Einstein and Bohr over the nature of reality and the soul of science. ‘Bohr brainwashed a whole generation of physicists into believing that the problem had been solved’, lamented the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Murray Gell-Mann. But in ‘Quantum’, Kumar brings Einstein back to the centre of the quantum debate. ‘Quantum’ is the essential read for anyone fascinated by this complex and thrilling story and by the band of brilliant men at its heart.
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  5. “If you want to understand the science issues that get into the news, this is the book for you. Author Robert Dinwiddie spells out the history of the problems modern science is confronting, tells you what’s at stake, and explains what the technical jargon really means in clear and simple English,”—back cover.
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  6. According to a leading cognitive scientist, we’ve been teaching reading wrong. The latest science reveals how we can do it right.In 2011, when an international survey reported that students in Shanghai dramatically outperformed American students in reading, math, and science, President Obama declared it a “Sputnik moment”: a wake-up call about the dismal state of American education. Little has changed, however, since then: over half of our children still read at a basic level and few become highly proficient. Many American children and adults are not functionally literate, with serious consequences. Poor readers are more likely to drop out of the educational system and as adults are unable to fully participate in the workforce, adequately manage their own health care, or advance their children’s education.In Language at the Speed of Sight, internationally renowned cognitive scientist Mark Seidenberg reveals the underexplored science of reading, which spans cognitive science, neurobiology, and linguistics. As Seidenberg shows, the disconnect between science and education is a major factor in America’s chronic underachievement. How we teach reading places many children at risk of failure, discriminates against poorer kids, and discourages even those who could have become more successful readers. Children aren’t taught basic print skills because educators cling to the disproved theory that good readers guess the words in texts, a strategy that encourages skimming instead of close reading. Interventions for children with reading disabilities are delayed because parents are mistakenly told their kids will catch up if they work harder. Learning to read is more difficult for children who speak a minority dialect in the home, but that is not reflected in classroom practices. By building on science’s insights, we can improve how our children read, and take real steps toward solving the inequality that illiteracy breeds.Both an expert look at our relationship with the written
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  7. The Photographic Card Deck of The Elements is the most detailed, lush, and beautiful set of cards ever produced on the subject of the periodic table. With 126, 5’X5’ cards in all, it includes one card for every one of the 118 elements, plus additional cards that explain the arrangement of the periodic table, present the elements sorted by various properties, and suggest activities and uses for the cards.The front side of each card shows a full-size, photographic image of the element, while the back gives scientific information including atomic weight, density, melting and boiling point, valence, and the percent of the element found in the universe, in the Earth’s crust, in oceans, and in humans. Graphics show melting/boiling points, density, electron configuration, and atomic radius. A fascinating fact about the element, as well as the date of its discovery, is also included.
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  8. Introduction by Professor Stephen Hawking.From what actually happened in the Big Bang to the accidental discovery of post-it notes, science is packed with surprising discoveries. Did you know, for instance, that if you were to get too close to a black hole it would suck you up like a noodle (it's called spaghettification), why your keyboard is laid out in QWERTY (it's not to make it easier to type) or whether the invention of the wheel was less important to civilization than the bag (think about it). New Scientist does. And now they and the New York Times' brilliant graphics editor Jennifer Daniel want to take you on a whistlestop journey from the start of our universe (through the history of stars, galaxies, meteorites, the Moon and dark energy) to our planet (through oceans and weather to oil) and life (through dinosaurs to emotions and sex) to civilization (from cities to alcohol and cooking), knowledge (from alphabets to alchemy) ending up with technology (computers to rocket science). Witty essays explore the concepts alongside enlightening infographics that zoom from how many people have ever lived to showing you how a left-wing brain differs from a right-wing one.About the AuthorsNew Scientist - Since 1956, New Scientist has established a world-beating reputation for exploring and uncovering the latest developments and discoveries in science and technology, placing them in context and exploring what they mean for the future. Each week through a variety of different channels, including print, online, social media and more, New Scientist reaches over 5 million highly engaged readers around the world. Graham Lawton - After a degree in biochemistry and a MSc in science communication, both from Imperial College, Graham Lawton landed at New Scientist, where he has been for almost all the 21st century, first as features editor and now as executive editor. His writing and editing have won a number of awards. Stephen Hawking is the former Lucasian Professor of Mathema
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