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  1. How long is 'now'? The short answer is 'somewhere between 2 and 3 seconds'. The long answer involves an incredible journey through neuroscience, our subconscious and the time-bending power of meditation. Living in the present may never feel the same. Ready for some more? Okay. Why isn't Pluto a planet? Why are dogs' noses wet? Why do hens cluck more loudly after laying an egg? What happens when one black hole swallows another? Do our fingerprints change as we get older? How young can you die of old age? And what is at the very edge of the Universe? Life is full of mind-bending questions. And, as books like What If? And Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze? have shown, the route to find each answer can take us on the weirdest and most wonderful journeys. How Long Is Now? is a fascinating new collection of questions you never thought to ask, along with answers that will change the way you see everything.About the AuthorSince the first magazine was published in 1956, New Scientist has established a world-beating reputation for exploring and uncovering the latest developments and discoveries in science and technology, placing them in context and exploring what they mean for the future. Each week through a variety of different channels, including print, online, social media and more, New Scientist reaches over four million highly engaged readers - over a million readers for the print magazine alone.
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  2. What is it that makes us human? Is it language, imagination, morality, or is it that we cook and wear shoes? Or perhaps we are less human than we think (Neanderthal and Denisovan genes can be found within all of us!).Once again, New Scientist have all of the fascinating and unexpected answers, and - just as they did for the universe in The Origin of (almost) Everything - in How to be Human they take us on a tour around the human body and brain, taking in everything from evolution to email, from the Stone Age to Spotify.How do languages change the way our brains are wired? What can evolutionary theory tell us about who we are attracted to? How does your voice give away clues about your political views, your sexual allure and even your salary? Why is gossip the human version of a gorilla picking fleas from its mate? And how can you live to 100?From the body to language , through emotions and possessions, to the most tricky questions about life and death, New Scientist's witty essays sit alongside enlightening illustrations that range from how your brain creates the illusion of 'self' to the allure of body odour.About the AuthorSince the first magazine was published in 1956, New Scientist has established a world-beating reputation for exploring and uncovering the latest developments and discoveries in science and technology, placing them in context and exploring what they mean for the future. Each week through a variety of different channels, including print, online, social media and more, New Scientist reaches over four million highly engaged readers - over a million readers for the print magazine alone.
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  3. How genes are not the only basis of heredity—and what this means for evolution, human life, and diseaseFor much of the twentieth century it was assumed that genes alone mediate the transmission of biological information across generations and provide the raw material for natural selection. In Extended Heredity, leading evolutionary biologists Russell Bonduriansky and Troy Day challenge this premise. Drawing on the latest research, they demonstrate that what happens during our lifetimes—and even our grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ lifetimes—can influence the features of our descendants. On the basis of these discoveries, Bonduriansky and Day develop an extended concept of heredity that upends ideas about how traits can and cannot be transmitted across generations. By examining the history of the gene-centered view in modern biology and reassessing fundamental tenets of evolutionary theory, Bonduriansky and Day show that nongenetic inheritance—involving epigenetic, environmental, behavioral, and cultural factors—could play an important role in evolution. The discovery of nongenetic inheritance therefore has major implications for key questions in evolutionary biology, as well as human health.Extended Heredity reappraises long-held ideas and opens the door to a new understanding of inheritance and evolution.
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  4. In a continuation of TIME’s successful books on science, this volume will range widely through the most captivating topics in nature-astronomy, physics, geology, climate, physiology and more-to present a host of fascinating facts. Each story will contain the scientific explanation for phenomena that defy credulity, from unique animal behaviors to the characteristics of distant galaxies, from amazing aspects of the human mind to the paradoxes of subatomic physics. The book will also include a history of debunked scientific theories, notions once taken for granted that have been shown to be false.
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  6. “If you want to understand the science issues that get into the news, this is the book for you. Author Robert Dinwiddie spells out the history of the problems modern science is confronting, tells you what’s at stake, and explains what the technical jargon really means in clear and simple English,”—back cover.
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  7. In this ground-breaking and entertaining exploration of athletic success, award-winning writer David Epstein gets to the heart of the great nature vs. nurture debate, and explodes myths about how and why humans excel. Along the way, Epstein exposes the flaws in the so-called 10,000-hour rule that states that rigorous practice from a young age is the only route to success. He shows why some skills that we imagine are innate are not like the bullet-fast reactions of a baseball player and why other characteristics that we assume are entirely voluntary, like the motivation to practice, might in fact have important genetic components. Throughout, The Sports Gene forces us to rethink the very nature of success.
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  8. How can a prime number be `sexy’ and `safe’ at the same time? Why shouldn’t Aussie cricketers be scared of the number 87? And how many bacteria live in your pants … All the answers and more are in Adam Spencer’s Big Book of Numbers. This is a book for readers of all ages who love numbers, who want to love numbers, or who just love to laugh and learn about the wonderful world we live in. For 15 years Adam Spencer has been entertaining us. On triple j and ABC radio and television, he’s established himself as Australia’s funniest and most famous mathematician. And now, by popular demand, we have his Big Book of Numbers, a fascinating journey from 1 to 100.
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  9. The Dogs That Made Australia pays tribute to the dogs that gave their all for our prosperity: the fearless hounds that saved fledgling colonies from famine; the courageous heelers and tireless collies that powered the rise of beef and wool; the tough little home-grown terriers that protected the homestead and garden; and the extraordinary police dogs, ahead of their time, loved by the nation. The selfless exploits of our heroic dogs are writ indelibly in our nation’s heritage and identity. The Dogs That Made Australia is a vivid and meticulously researched history of Australia told from the perspectives of the dingo and the dogs that were imported and developed here, as well as the humans who loved, feared and worked them. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander listeners are warned that this audiobook contains names of people who have died.
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  10. From Stonehenge to beyond the Big Bang, an exhilarating scientific exploration of how we make time Time is the grandest conception of the universe that we humans have been able to imagine – and its most intimate, the very frame of human life. In About Time, astrophysicist and award-winning writer Adam Frank tells the scientific story of this wonderful and tyrannical invention. A Palaeolithic farmer moved through the sun-fuelled day and star-steered night in a radically different way than the Elizabethan merchants who set their pace to the clocks newly installed in their town squares. Since then, science has swept time into increasingly minute and standardized units – the industrial efficiency of ironworks’ punch clocks; the space-age precision of atomic fountains and GPS satellites; the fifteen-minute increments of Outlook’s digital revolution. And in the past decade, string-theory branes, multiverses, and “clockless” physics have begun to overturn our ideas about how the universe began – the Big Bang – in ways that will completely rewrite time and our experience of it. Weaving cosmology with day-to-day chronicles and a down-to-earth style, About Time is both dazzling and riveting as it confronts what comes next.
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  11. According to a leading cognitive scientist, we’ve been teaching reading wrong. The latest science reveals how we can do it right.In 2011, when an international survey reported that students in Shanghai dramatically outperformed American students in reading, math, and science, President Obama declared it a “Sputnik moment”: a wake-up call about the dismal state of American education. Little has changed, however, since then: over half of our children still read at a basic level and few become highly proficient. Many American children and adults are not functionally literate, with serious consequences. Poor readers are more likely to drop out of the educational system and as adults are unable to fully participate in the workforce, adequately manage their own health care, or advance their children’s education.In Language at the Speed of Sight, internationally renowned cognitive scientist Mark Seidenberg reveals the underexplored science of reading, which spans cognitive science, neurobiology, and linguistics. As Seidenberg shows, the disconnect between science and education is a major factor in America’s chronic underachievement. How we teach reading places many children at risk of failure, discriminates against poorer kids, and discourages even those who could have become more successful readers. Children aren’t taught basic print skills because educators cling to the disproved theory that good readers guess the words in texts, a strategy that encourages skimming instead of close reading. Interventions for children with reading disabilities are delayed because parents are mistakenly told their kids will catch up if they work harder. Learning to read is more difficult for children who speak a minority dialect in the home, but that is not reflected in classroom practices. By building on science’s insights, we can improve how our children read, and take real steps toward solving the inequality that illiteracy breeds.Both an expert look at our relationship with the written
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  12. From the bestselling author of The Hidden Life of Trees and The Inner Life of Animals, a book that explores the invisible connections that maintain the balance of the entire natural world. Did you know that trees can make clouds? Or that a change in wolf population can alter the course of a river? Or that earth worms give wild boar directions? The natural world is a web of intricate connections, many of which go unnoticed by humans. But it is these connections that maintain nature’s finely balanced equilibrium, and tinkering with one tiny element can set off a chain reaction that affects an entire ecosystem. In The Secret Network of Nature, forester and bestselling author Peter Wohlleben opens our eyes to surprising connections and unlikely partnerships in nature. We’ll see how different animals, plants, rivers, rocks and weather systems co-operate, and what happens when these delicate systems are unbalanced.
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  13. Includes: Wiley Plus, Wiley E-Text and Student Resource Companion.
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